Drug research at home – (how) is that possible? – Part 2

Continuing on after part 1:

What to do with the tools

I’m assuming that you have (some) knowledge on how to search, what to look out for, a  workflow on the different steps required to do the job. It’s otherwise a topic on it’s own for another time. Not that it hasn’t been described before, alas, no, see just one example here:

Nicola, G., Berthold, M. R., Hedrick, M. P., & Gilson, M. K. (2015). Connecting proteins with drug-like compounds: Open source drug discovery workflows with BindingDB and KNIME. Database: The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation, 2015, bav087. https://doi.org/10.1093/database/bav087

Actual Compounds

So you identified something and want to test your hypothesis beyond in-silico. Well, that is a bit tougher – you can’t really handle and test compounds at home. Theoretically though,  you could have someone else do this part for you (order commercial compounds, synthesize something new, test in a biological assay). That is (unfortunately) not for free.

Though to obtain compounds ,if you are (or have connections to) academia or a (smaller) company, there are some interesting initiatives are available, such as within Malaria research by http://www.mmv.org/research-development/open-source-research/open-access-malaria-box, though now more broadly for pathogens at http://www.pathogenbox.org/. Then there are possibilities as described in the next section.

Once you think you have something

Actual testing aside (it never hurts), what can you do with those cool results? Well, there are a number of things – the simplest one would be: write a blog! More involved and scientifically more appropriate – at the same time more difficult – write a publication in a scientific journal or present at a scientific meeting. You could even try and patent your findings, if you have the finances. It all depends on the impact you want to have.

To go beyond a publication, if you want to be part of/follow your findings, you can contact some of the initiatives by pharmaceutical companies who are open to collaboration on new findings. For example,  Johnsson&Johnsson [jnjinnovation.com/partner-with-us], or AstraZeneca [openinnovation.astrazeneca.com], or the Medicines for Malaria Venture [www.mmv.org/partnering/our-partner-network] and many more. You can also find incubators within academia, but then you would require some contact to a research group within. The list of incubators/companies & universities is nowadays quite big and could be a topic for a separate blog entry.

If you are really in it for the money though, I think you will be disappointed. Doing drug research from home is more like a hobby just fun, in the best case though for the greater good. Having said that, should you really find something interesting and you contact any of the above mentioned initiatives, intellectual property and reimbursements will most likely be on the table at some point.

Now, start researching!